Our Faculty

Geoffrey Baker

Research Areas
Associate Professor Geoffrey Baker works on 19th- and 20th-century literature, with a primary focus on western Europe and the novel. His first book investigates the use of colonial figures in 19th-century European realism (Realism’s Empire, Ohio State UP, 2009), and his more recent book discusses two dominant theories of politically engaged literature since the 1870s (The Aesthetics of Clarity and Confusion, Palgrave Macmillan, 2017). He is currently completing a third book, on the relationship between evolving philosophical and legal theories of evidence in 19th-century Britain, and the 19th-century British novel from Jane Austen to Anthony Trollope. His articles have addressed various other topics, such as: violence in Marguerite Duras’ Hiroshima mon amour; the political potential of French hip-hop artist MC Solaar; ethics in the fiction of J.M. Coetzee; and the role of Berlin in the field of contemporary German literary production.
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Teaching Subjects
  • Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Literature (especially British, French, German)
  • Realism and Naturalism
  • Political Aesthetics
  • Fiction and the Supernatural
  • Imperialism in Literature
  • Literature and the Law (Evidence, Empiricism)
  • The Bildungsroman
  • The History and Theory of the Novel

 

Nienke Boer

Research Areas
Dr Nienke Boer's work focuses on the transnational literatures of the Indian Ocean world. Her first book manuscript, provisionally titled Enslaved, Indentured, Interned: Speech and Silence in the Briny South, examines the legal, autobiographical and fictional narratives by and about involuntary or coerced migrants crossing the Indian Ocean. Her new project proposes the existence of the "Global South Novel" as a distinct twenty-first century genre. Her research and teaching interests include: African literatures, South Asian literatures, the Global South, Slavery Studies, Law and Literature, Diaspora and Transnational Studies, the Dutch East India Company, and Oceanic Literary Theory.
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Teaching Subjects
  • Literature and Humanities I
  • The Afropolitans: Contemporary African Literature and Film
  • Oceanic Frameworks: Shifting Currents in Literary Studies
  • Equiano’s Slave Narrative: Text and Contexts (HI)
  • The Global South Novel
  • Mean Streets: The Detective and the City

Scott Cook

Research Areas
Professor Scott Cook specialises in pre-imperial textual studies and early Chinese intellectual history, with emphases in recently excavated bamboo manuscripts and musical thought.
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Teaching Subjects
  • Philosophy and Political Thought 1
  • Classical Chinese
  • “Tales of the Strange”
  • Intellectual Thought in the Warring States

Steven James Green

Research Areas
Assoc Prof Green specialises in Roman literature and culture in the late republic and early empire (first centuries BC and AD) and is particularly interested in those texts that are typically overlooked, unread, or unappreciated by modern readers. For this reason, his research has moved from the conventional world of Ovid to more marginal poems, such as the astrological treatise of Manilius, the hunting manual of Grattius, and now a Latin version of Homer’s Iliad, on which he is currently writing a commentary, complete with text and translation, to appear with Oxford University Press in 2023.
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Teaching Subjects
  • Literature and Humanities 1
  • Latin (all levels: Beginning, Intermediate and Advanced)
  • Ovid the Innovator
  • The Roman Emperor Nero: Sex, Stage and Scandal

Gretchen Head

Research Areas
Dr Gretchen Head’s research interests include the roots of the modern novel in Arabic and the genre’s relationship to the pre-modern Arabic/Islamic narrative tradition; the links between historical/philosophical writing and modern narrative; the relationship between traditional Islamic institutions and literary production; literature’s intersection with urban space; gender; and new paradigms of world literature that offer the possibility of greater inclusion of the literatures of the Global South.
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Teaching Subjects
  • Literature and Humanities I & II
  • World Literature and its Discontents

Andrew Hui

Research Areas
Dr Andrew Hui’s work is concerned with the classical tradition in European Renaissance culture and how humanist authors absorbed and adapted the archive of antiquity in their works. His methodology is a philological and transnational one—he has published across Latin, Italian, French, and English epic, drama, visual arts, poetry and poetics.
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Teaching Subjects
  • Literature & Humanities 1 & 2
  • Dante and the European Middle Ages
  • Shakespeare and the Shape of Life
  • Renaissance Literature
  • The Classical Tradition

Ma Shaoling

Research Areas
Dr Shaoling Ma’s research and teaching interests include nineteenth-century to contemporary Sinophone literature and culture, critical and post-critical theory’s interrogations of history, subjectivity, materiality, media, and technology.
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Teaching Subjects
  • Literature and Humanities I and II
  • Global Science Fiction
  • New Media and Literature
  • Sinophone Literature and Culture
  • Goodbye Mao? China’s Postsocialist Transformations

Jane Nardin

Research Areas
Dr Jane Nardin taught in the US for thirty-five years before arriving in Singapore in 2006. She writes both literary criticism and fiction, and she enjoys helping students improve their own writing. At NUS, she has taught modules in English literature of every century from the fourteenth through the twentieth. The classes she teaches most frequently concern women writers of the nineteenth century and the modernist period, especially Jane Austen, the Brontës, Virginia Woolf, and Katherine Mansfield. She has published books on Jane Austen, Anthony Trollope, and Barbara Pym, as well as articles about a variety of English novelists. Her most recent publications are two young adult novels set in India during the nineteenth century.
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Teaching Subjects
  • Literature and Humanities 1 & 2
  • Late Medieval Literature and Culture
  • Topics in the Twentieth-Century: Modernist Fiction by Women
  • Literature and Censorship
  • English Literature: The Seventeenth Century
  • English Literature: The Nineteenth Century
  • The Global Short Story
  • English Women Novelists 1750-1800
  • English Women Novelists 1800-1900

Rajeev Patke

Research Areas
Professor Rajeev Patke’s research interests include postcolonial and modernist writing in English, the works of Walter Benjamin, and the relation of poetry and painting to the idea of representation. He is currently researching the literary cultures of islands.
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Teaching Subjects
  • Literature and Humanities I & II
  • Dystopian fiction
  • Poetry, Painting and Photography

Mira Seo

Research Areas
Associate Professor Mira Seo specialises in Roman poetry of the imperial period, with particular interests in Roman literary characterisation and discourses of self-construction in ancient philosophy and oratory; the rhetoric of money in Roman poetry; neo-Latin poetry in 16th-century Spain; and classical reception in popular culture.
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Teaching Subjects
  • Literature and Humanities 1 & 2
  • Roman Literary Culture
  • Ancient Epic and Gangster Films
  • Food in Roman Literature
  • Ancient Comedy

Heidi Stalla

Research Areas
Dr Heidi Stalla explores the way that writers challenge the boundaries of fiction and nonfiction in their work. Dr Stalla is particularly interested in the work of Virginia Woolf and has written about the degree to which Woolf’s craft was not only informed by a lifelong interest in historical genres, but also alludes to the appropriation of material and literary culture from Greece, India, and Egypt as a form of sociopolitical critique.
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Teaching Subjects
  • Literature and Humanities II
  • Introduction to Creative Nonfiction
  • Advanced Creative Nonfiction
  • Travel Writing
  • The Craft of Virginia Woolf

Carissa Foo

Research Areas
Dr Carissa Foo’s field of research is twentieth-century women’s writing and its dialogues with perception theory and queer studies. She is interested in spatial expression and lived experience in modernist works. More recently, her writing is concerned with love studies, spatial-sexual discipline, and the nuances of friendship.
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Teaching Subjects
  • Literature and Humanities II
  • Queer Fictions
  • The Love Letter in 20C Literature
  • Bad Love in 20C Literature
  • Girlfriends: Narratives of Friendship
  • Modernist Women’s Writing: 1910 – 1939

Kevin Goldstein

Research Areas
Dr Kevin Daniel Goldstein’s main research interests include hemispheric studies: the comparison of US and Latin American literary traditions; modernism; and disability studies, particularly the impact of disability on creativity and artistic identity. His broader interests include Jewish studies; affect theory; performance studies; oral poetics; and cognitive approaches to literature. He is currently working on a book manuscript entitled On Our Blindness: Embodiment and Disability in the Literature of the Americas.
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Teaching Subjects
  • Literature and Humanities I and II
  • Disability and the Arts
  • Latin American Realities
  • Jorge Luis Borges and Literary Theory
  • Mexican Revolutionary Aesthetics

Emily Dalton

Research Areas
Dr Emily Dalton specialises in English, French, and Welsh literature of the twelfth to fourteenth centuries, and is particularly interested in the philosophy of language, translation, romance, and insular multilingualism. Her research seeks to uncover the connections between bodies of material not often studied together (such as Welsh and English writing, or literature and the philosophy of language) in order to contribute to a more nuanced literary history of medieval Britain.
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Teaching Subjects
  • Literature and Humanities I & II
  • Medieval Romance
  • Death, Mourning and Memory in Medieval Literature